Public Holidays for 2019

Public Holidays for 2019

  1. The dates of the 11 gazetted public holidays for 2019 are as follows:
    New Year’s Day 1 Jan 2019 Tuesday
    Chinese New Year 5 Feb 2019 Tuesday
    6 Feb 2019 Wednesday
    Good Friday 19 Apr 2019 Friday
    Labour Day 1 May 2019 Wednesday
    Vesak Day 19 May 2019* Sunday
    Hari Raya Puasa 5 Jun 2019 Wednesday
    National Day 9 Aug 2019 Friday
    Hari Raya Haji 11 Aug 2019* Sunday
    Deepavali 27 Oct 2019* Sunday
    Christmas Day 25 Dec 2019 Wednesday

    * The following Monday will be a public holiday.

  2. The list of public holidays for 2019 is available on the Ministry of Manpower’s website (www.mom.gov.sg/employment-practices/public-holidays). 

    PAYMENT FOR WORK DONE ON A PUBLIC HOLIDAY

  3. The Ministry would like to remind all employers that under the Employment Act:
    • An employee who is required to work on a public holiday is entitled to an extra day’s salary at the basic rate of pay.
    • Alternatively, the employer and employee may mutually agree to substitute a public holiday for another working day.
    • An employer also has the additional option of granting managers and executives, earning up to a basic monthly salary of $4,500, time-off-in-lieu for working on a public holiday. The time off should consist of a mutually agreed number of hours.
  4. For more information on the Public Holiday provisions under the Employment Act, please refer to the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) website.

2018 public holidays Singapore

    1. The dates of the 11 gazetted public holidays for 2018 are as follows: 
      New Year’s Day 1 Jan 2018 Monday
      Chinese New Year 16 Feb 2018 Friday
      17 Feb 2018 Saturday
      Good Friday 30 Mar 2018 Friday
      Labour Day 1 May 2018 Tuesday
      Vesak Day 29 May 2018 Tuesday
      Hari Raya Puasa 15 Jun 2018 Friday
      National Day 9 Aug 2018 Thursday
      Hari Raya Haji 22 Aug 2018 Wednesday
      Deepavali 6 Nov 2018 Tuesday
      Christmas Day 25 Dec 2018 Tuesday
    2. The list of public holidays for 2018 is available on the Ministry of Manpower’s website.

PAYMENT FOR WORK DONE ON A PUBLIC HOLIDAY

    1. The Ministry would like to remind all employers that under the Employment Act:
      • An employee who is required to work on a public holiday is entitled to an extra day’s salary at the basic rate of pay.
      • Alternatively, the employer and employee may mutually agree to substitute a public holiday for another working day.
      • An employer also has the additional option of granting managers and executives, time-off-in-lieu for working on a public holiday. The time off should consist of a mutually agreed number of hours.

 

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS ON SATURDAYS

  1. Under the Employment Act, if a public holiday falls on a Saturday, an employee who is not required to work on a Saturday is entitled to another day off or an extra day’s salary in lieu of that public holiday.

For more information on the Public Holiday provisions under the Employment Act, please refer to the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) website.

Exact from MOM website on holidays entitlement and pay, look below:

Public holidays: entitlement and pay

You are entitled to 11 paid public holidays a year in accordance with the Employment Act. If you are required to work on a public holiday, your employer should pay you an extra day’s salary or grant you off in lieu.

The 11 public holidays

If you are covered by the Employment Act, you are entitled to 11 paid public holidays in a year.

The 11 gazetted public holidays are:

  1. New Year’s Day
  2. Chinese New Year – first day
  3. Chinese New Year – second day
  4. Hari Raya Puasa
  5. Hari Raya Haji
  6. Good Friday
  7. Labour Day
  8. Vesak Day
  9. National Day
  10. Deepavali
  11. Christmas Day
If the holiday falls on a rest day, the next working day will be a paid holiday.

Holiday pay

You are entitled to your gross rate of pay on a public holiday, if:

  • You were not absent on the working day immediately before or after a holiday without consent or a reasonable excuse.
  • You are on authorised leave (e.g. sick leave, annual leave, unpaid leave) on the day immediately before or after a holiday.

You are not entitled to holiday pay if the holiday falls on your approved unpaid leave.

  • If you are on approved unpaid leave on 8 August, you will still be entitled to a paid public holiday on 9 August.
  • If you are on approved unpaid leave from 8 to 10 August, you will not be eligible for a paid public holiday on 9 August.

Public holidays falling on a rest day or non-working day

In accordance with the Employment Act, if a public holiday falls on a non-working day, you are entitled to another day off or one extra day’s salary in lieu of the public holiday at the gross rate of pay.

If you are on a 5-day work week, Saturday would be considered your non-working day. For a public holiday that falls on a Saturday, you should get either a day off or salary in lieu.

If a public holiday falls on your rest day, the following working day will be a paid public holiday.

If you are not covered by the Employment Act, it will be according to the terms of your employment contract.

If you work on a public holiday

If you work on a public holiday, by default, your employer should pay you. Alternatively, by mutual agreement, you can get a public holiday in lieu; or time off in lieu (applies only to managers and executives).

Pay for working on a holiday

If you are required to work on a public holiday, you should be paid an extra day’s salary at the basic rate of pay.

  • Your monthly gross salary already includes payment for the holiday, so your employer need only pay you an additional day’s pay.
  • If you are absent without reason on the working day before or after the holiday, you are not entitled to the holiday pay. Your employer can therefore deduct one day’s pay at the gross rate from your monthly gross salary.

Under different scenarios, your pay for working on a public holiday is as follows:

If you work on a public holiday that falls on You are entitled to the following
A working day
  • An extra day’s salary at the basic rate of pay.
  • The gross rate of pay for that holiday.
  • Overtime pay if you work beyond your normal hours of work.
A non-working day (e.g. Saturday for employees on a 5-day work week)
  • Overtime pay for extra hours worked on a Saturday.
  • One extra day’s salary at the gross rate of pay or another day off for the public holiday.
A rest day

The next working day will be a paid holiday instead.

Calculate your public holiday pay

Public holiday in lieu

If you work on a public holiday, you and your employer can mutually agree to substitute a public holiday for another working day.

Time off in lieu (for managers and executives)

If you are in a managerial or executive position, your employer may grant you time off in lieu for working on a public holiday. The time off should consist of a mutually agreed number of hours.

If there is no mutual agreement on the duration of time off in lieu, your employer can decide on one of the following:

  • Pay an extra day’s salary at the basic rate of pay for one day’s work.
  • For working 4 hours or less on a holiday, grant time off in lieu of 4 hours on a working day.
  • For working more than 4 hours on a holiday, grant a full day off on a working day.

You may be interested to know in 2017, what are the Singapore public holidays 2017. Here are they:

Singapore’s Ministry of Manpower (MOM) has unveiled its list of 11 gazetted public holiday for 2017, giving seven reasons for employers and their teams to rejoice – long weekends.

The following is the full list of holidays: [* marks the seven long weekends]

1 Jan 2017 – New Year’s Day – Sunday*
28-29 Jan 2017 – Chinese New Year – Saturday and Sunday*
14 Apr 2017 – Good Friday – Friday*
1 May 2017 – Labour Day – Monday*
10 May 2017 – Vesak Day – Wednesday
25 Jun 2017 – Hari Raya Puasa – Sunday*
9 Aug 2017 – National Day – Wednesday
1 Sep 2017 – Hari Raya Haji – Friday*
18 Oct 2017 – Deepavali – Wednesday
25 Dec 2017 – Christmas – Monday*

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